MY DRAWINGS
FAQ

evinist:

Nightwing had enough of you two dramatic duo.


11 hours ago with 1,455 notes
originally evinist

algrenion:

overlypolitebisexual:

whenever i see these post-apocalyptic films set in the USA where everyone is pretty much just killing each other with no mention of other nations i always just assume that the rest of the world is fine and has learnt how to resume life as normal

 


14 hours ago with 180,300 notes
originally overlypolitebisexual
camaryllis:

catching up with korra s3! can’t wait to see more of the villains this season >:)

camaryllis:

catching up with korra s3! can’t wait to see more of the villains this season >:)


14 hours ago with 1,716 notes
originally camaryllis
elventhespian:

deesky:

I’m back with the chinesse ink and paper.
Korra in Manga style.

This is cute. :D

elventhespian:

deesky:

I’m back with the chinesse ink and paper.

Korra in Manga style.

This is cute. :D


14 hours ago with 2,342 notes
originally deesky

(Source: flxwerpuffgirls)


14 hours ago with 57,443 notes
originally flxwerpuffgirls

missisgrayson:

 

DC Comics’ Diversity Crisis: Why the Status Quo Rules

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

arte-mysia:

Of course, the few comments so far are mostly by offensive Neanderthals.  Thought certain followers might be interested in this article.

DC does need more diversity and the fact they won’t let Kate and Maggie marry IS fucked up

BUT

Saying that DC has a bigger problem with a lack of diversity and the white straight cis ‘status quo’ than Marvel is questionable to me

DC currently has a book that STARS an out lesbian woman in a loving and committed relationship with another lesbian woman, with gay and lesbian characters in the supporting cast

It has a queer trans woman and her lesbian girlfriend in Batgirl and the creators have promised further LGBTQI representation to come

It has a queer POC woman in Aquaman and the Others, a gay man starring in Earth 2, two gay male characters and two canon lesbian characters in Batman Eternal right now, a gay couple in the supporting cast of The Flash

Meanwhile Marvel?

Marvel has NO lesbian couples in ANY of their comics

Marvel has ONE lesbian woman in All new Ultimates who has so far never been portrayed actually having a relationship with another girl

It has a gay man who never dates in Avengers Undercover and another gay man who never does or says anything to actually indicate that he’s gay beyond ONE line of dialogue several issues ago in Uncanny X-men

It has NO trans women

It has no POC queer women

It has NO gay male couples appearing in any of its books at present.

And yeah, a woman is now Thor…a white, cis woman who will, most likely, be straight given Marvel’s track record to date…this isn’t to say that the new Thor won’t be fun to read but it’s really not progressive to have a blonde white straight cis woman starring in a comic

DC DOES need to do better when it comes to diversity

But for all their mistakes, they are doing a hell of a lot better than Marvel has EVER done. Marvel’s history is a history of ignoring queer people, ESPECIALLY queer women actually exist and of bigoted and lesbophobic treatment of queer female characters in addition to multiple instances of transphobic ‘humour’

DC had books with lesbian and trans women back when Marvel’s ‘LGBTQI representation’ consisted of Northstar…and that’s it

Being excited about the new Captain America and Thor is fine and I am totally looking forward to seeing what happens with them as well but let’s not make the mistake that just because Marvel has added a bit more POC and female representation to their A-list heroes that Marvel is some amazing, progressive example that DC should aspire toward because Marvel are still one of the most backward and stuck in the past comics publishers in existence right now :(

Marvel has a LOT of problematic and troubling problems in its stories and among its writing staff and should not be viewed as some beacon of acceptance and progressiveness


14 hours ago with 639 notes
originally arte-mysia

(Source: shewhoneverforgets)


14 hours ago with 1,787 notes
originally shewhoneverforgets

garykingoftheworld:

Ya know something interesting about the Marvel/DC ‘rivalry’ on tumblr?

Everyone acts like DC is this super regressive company compared to Marvel when DC really did more progressive stuff first and is still doing so.

Women as heroes?
DC’s had Wonder Woman as one of their three major heroes forever, but everyone ignores that because “But she doesn’t have a movie yet” (more on that later)

While Marvel can claim the first black hero in comics with Black Panther, DC actually had heroes talking explicitly about race with John Stewart and Hal Jordan, and did a lot of issues with progressiveism and liberalism vs convsativism in the Green Arrow/Green Lantern series (including a black person calling out Hal on how little he did to fight oppression on earth as he did the rest of the universe), and Green Arrow and Hawkeye arguing politics was a common thread of their time on the JLA together.

Black Lightning was the first African-American superhero with no criminal record (Luke Cage did get his powers in prison, it’s kinda stereotypical)

DC itself actually funded and published Milestone comics, a comics company entirely devoted to more diverse comics. If you’ve ever heard of Static you owe DC comics.

Marvel has never had anything even remotely equivalent.

When it comes to LGBT stuff, DC comics had a lesbian Batwoman and a lesbian woman taking over from a male hero in The Question.
While not a hero explicitly DC has a transwoman supporting character in Batgirl. (And I’m not even counting the trans characters in Vertigo books.)
It has Alan Scott being gay inthe Nu52 continuity, 
I know Grace Choi was bisexual pre-reboot (I don’t know the current status)
Had a gay black teen hero in the Superboy & the Ravers comic in the 90s, as well as the character of Obsidian who was a major supporting character in the JSA.

The idea of characters of color or a different gender taking the place of legacy characters is nothing new for DC.
Like I mentioned, a lesbian Latin@ became the Question, there was an asian woman hero Doctor Light, a black woman Doctor Midnight, a Latina became the new Wildcat.

Now I mentioned I’d get back to movies later on and, let’s look at DC & Marvels movies in terms of ethnicity here, most notably the recent casting rumors.

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson basically said he’d be playing Shazam.
Shazam, a previously white hero, played by a Black & Samoan man.

Aquaman, if rumors are to be believed, will be played by Jason Momoa.
Aquaman, a white blonde haired, blue eyed hero, played by a Samoan man.

Meanwhile over at Marvel….Well Falcon and Rhodey get to exist, but they’re up to this point still just little more than sidekicks to the white heroes in the movies.
Marvel makes a movie about a superhero team and goes “Yeah, everyone is still white as they were in the 1960s.” 
DC looks at their superhero team and says “We need to make the team more diverse, even if it means changing the race of the heroes” and people act like they’re some super regressive company.


I’m fine with folks preferring one company over the other.
I’m fine with folks being excited Marvel is having legacy characters change race and/or gender with who gets to pick up the legacy.

But as a lifelong comic fan it’s kinda annoying to see people praising Marvel as super progressive for doing shit DC did in the 80s and still does to this day.

Especially when with Marvel it’s coming across far more as a blatant publicity grabs.


14 hours ago with 2,124 notes
originally garykingoftheworld
思い出のマーニー | When Marnie Was There {x}

(Source: nigecha)


5 days ago with 3,490 notes
originally nigecha

5 days ago with 130,531 notes
originally bestlols
holisticsexualhealth:

Gay Men’s Sexism and Women’s Bodies

At a recent presentation, I asked all of the gay male students in the room to raise their hand if in the past week they touched a woman’s body without her consent. After a moment of hesitation, all of the hands of the gay men in the room went up. I then asked the same gay men to raise their hand if in the past week they offered a woman unsolicited advice about how to “improve” her body or her fashion. Once again, after a moment of hesitation, all of the hands in the room went up.
These questions came after a brief exploration of gay men’s relationship to American fashion and women’s bodies. That dialogue included recognizing that gay men in the United States are often hailed as the experts of women’s fashion and by proxy women’s bodies. In addition to this there is a dominant logic that suggests that because gay men have no conscious desire to be sexually intimate with women, our uninvited touching and groping (physical assault) is benign.
These attitudes have led many gay men to feel curiously comfortable critiquing and touching women’s bodies at whim.  What’s unique about this is not the male sense of ownership to women’s bodies—that is somewhat common.  What’s curious is the minimization of these acts by gay men and many women because the male perpetuating the act is or is perceived to be gay.
An example: I was at a gay club in Atlanta with a good friend of mine who is a heterosexual black woman. While dancing in the club, a white gay male reached out and grabbed both her breasts aggressively. Shocked, she pushed him away immediately. When we both confronted him he told us:  “It’s no big deal, I’m gay, I don’t want her– I was just having fun.” We expressed our frustrations to him and demanded he apologize, but he simply refused. He clearly felt entitled to touch her body and could not even acknowledge the fact that he had assaulted her.
I have experienced this attitude as being very common amongst gay men. It should also be noted that in this case, she was a black woman and he a white gay male, which makes this an eyebrow-raising dynamic as it invokes the psychological history of white men’s entitlement to black women’s bodies. However it has been my experience that this dynamic of assault with gay men and women also persists within racial groups.
At another presentation, I told this same story to the audience. Almost instantly, several young women raised up their hands to be called upon. Each of them recounted a different story with a similar theme. One young woman told a story that stuck with me:
“I was feeling really cute in this outfit I put together. Then I see this gay guy I knew from class, but not very well. I had barely said hi before he began telling me what was wrong with how I looked, how I needed to lose weight, and how if I wanted to get a man I needed to do certain things… In the midst of this, he grabbed my breasts and pushed them together, to tell me how my breasts should look as opposed to how they did.  It really brought me down. I didn’t know how to respond… I was so shocked.”
Her story invoked rage amongst many other women in the audience, and an obvious silence amongst the gay men present. Their silence spoke volumes.  What also seemed to speak volumes, though not ever articulated verbally, was the sense that many of the heterosexual women had not responded (aggressively or otherwise) out of fear of being perceived as homophobic. (Or that their own homophobia, in an aggressive response, would reveal itself.) This, curiously to me, did not seem to be a concern for the lesbian and queer-identified women in the room at all.
Acts like these are apart of the everyday psychological warfare against women and girls that pits them against unrealistic beauty standards and ideals. It is also a part of the culture’s constant message to women that their bodies are not their own.
It’s very disturbing, but in a culture that doesn’t  see gay men who are perceived as “queer” as “men” or as having male privilege, our misogyny and sexist acts are instead read as “diva worship” or “celebrating women”, even when in reality they are objectification, assault and dehumanization.
The unique way our entitlement to women’s physical bodies plays itself out is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gay cisgender men’s sexism and privilege. This privilege does not make one a bad person any more than straight privilege makes heterosexuals bad people. It does mean that gay men can sometimes be just as unthinkingly hurtful, and unthinkingly a part of a system that participates in the oppression of others, an experience most of us can relate to. Exploration of these dynamics can lead us to query institutional systems and policies that reflect this privilege, nuanced as it is by other identities and social locations.
At the end of my last workshop on gay men’s sexism, I extended a number of questions to the gay men in the audience. I think it’s relevant to extend these same questions now:
How is your sexism and misogyny showing up in your own life, and in your relationships with your female friends, trans, lesbian, queer or heterosexual? How is it showing up in your relationship to your mothers, aunts and sisters?  Is it showing up in your expectations of how they should treat you? How you talk to them? What steps can you take to address the inequitable representation of gay cisgender men in your community as leaders? How do you see that privilege showing up in your organizations and policy, and what can you do to circumvent it? How will you talk to other gay men in your community about their choices and interactions with women, and how will you work to hold them and yourself accountable?
These are just some of the questions we need to be asking ourselves so that we can help create communities where sexual or physical assault, no matter who is doing it, is deemed unacceptable. These are the kinds of questions we as gay men need to be asking ourselves so that we can continue (or for some begin) the work of addressing gender/sex inequity in our own communities, as well as in our own hearts and minds. This is a part of our healing work. This is a part of our transformation. This is a part of our accountability.

holisticsexualhealth:

Gay Men’s Sexism and Women’s Bodies

At a recent presentation, I asked all of the gay male students in the room to raise their hand if in the past week they touched a woman’s body without her consent. After a moment of hesitation, all of the hands of the gay men in the room went up. I then asked the same gay men to raise their hand if in the past week they offered a woman unsolicited advice about how to “improve” her body or her fashion. Once again, after a moment of hesitation, all of the hands in the room went up.

These questions came after a brief exploration of gay men’s relationship to American fashion and women’s bodies. That dialogue included recognizing that gay men in the United States are often hailed as the experts of women’s fashion and by proxy women’s bodies. In addition to this there is a dominant logic that suggests that because gay men have no conscious desire to be sexually intimate with women, our uninvited touching and groping (physical assault) is benign.

These attitudes have led many gay men to feel curiously comfortable critiquing and touching women’s bodies at whim.  What’s unique about this is not the male sense of ownership to women’s bodies—that is somewhat common.  What’s curious is the minimization of these acts by gay men and many women because the male perpetuating the act is or is perceived to be gay.

An example: I was at a gay club in Atlanta with a good friend of mine who is a heterosexual black woman. While dancing in the club, a white gay male reached out and grabbed both her breasts aggressively. Shocked, she pushed him away immediately. When we both confronted him he told us:  “It’s no big deal, I’m gay, I don’t want her– I was just having fun.” We expressed our frustrations to him and demanded he apologize, but he simply refused. He clearly felt entitled to touch her body and could not even acknowledge the fact that he had assaulted her.

I have experienced this attitude as being very common amongst gay men. It should also be noted that in this case, she was a black woman and he a white gay male, which makes this an eyebrow-raising dynamic as it invokes the psychological history of white men’s entitlement to black women’s bodies. However it has been my experience that this dynamic of assault with gay men and women also persists within racial groups.

At another presentation, I told this same story to the audience. Almost instantly, several young women raised up their hands to be called upon. Each of them recounted a different story with a similar theme. One young woman told a story that stuck with me:

“I was feeling really cute in this outfit I put together. Then I see this gay guy I knew from class, but not very well. I had barely said hi before he began telling me what was wrong with how I looked, how I needed to lose weight, and how if I wanted to get a man I needed to do certain things… In the midst of this, he grabbed my breasts and pushed them together, to tell me how my breasts should look as opposed to how they did.  It really brought me down. I didn’t know how to respond… I was so shocked.”

Her story invoked rage amongst many other women in the audience, and an obvious silence amongst the gay men present. Their silence spoke volumes.  What also seemed to speak volumes, though not ever articulated verbally, was the sense that many of the heterosexual women had not responded (aggressively or otherwise) out of fear of being perceived as homophobic. (Or that their own homophobia, in an aggressive response, would reveal itself.) This, curiously to me, did not seem to be a concern for the lesbian and queer-identified women in the room at all.

Acts like these are apart of the everyday psychological warfare against women and girls that pits them against unrealistic beauty standards and ideals. It is also a part of the culture’s constant message to women that their bodies are not their own.

It’s very disturbing, but in a culture that doesn’t  see gay men who are perceived as “queer” as “men” or as having male privilege, our misogyny and sexist acts are instead read as “diva worship” or “celebrating women”, even when in reality they are objectification, assault and dehumanization.

The unique way our entitlement to women’s physical bodies plays itself out is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gay cisgender men’s sexism and privilege. This privilege does not make one a bad person any more than straight privilege makes heterosexuals bad people. It does mean that gay men can sometimes be just as unthinkingly hurtful, and unthinkingly a part of a system that participates in the oppression of others, an experience most of us can relate to. Exploration of these dynamics can lead us to query institutional systems and policies that reflect this privilege, nuanced as it is by other identities and social locations.

At the end of my last workshop on gay men’s sexism, I extended a number of questions to the gay men in the audience. I think it’s relevant to extend these same questions now:

How is your sexism and misogyny showing up in your own life, and in your relationships with your female friends, trans, lesbian, queer or heterosexual? How is it showing up in your relationship to your mothers, aunts and sisters?  Is it showing up in your expectations of how they should treat you? How you talk to them? What steps can you take to address the inequitable representation of gay cisgender men in your community as leaders? How do you see that privilege showing up in your organizations and policy, and what can you do to circumvent it? How will you talk to other gay men in your community about their choices and interactions with women, and how will you work to hold them and yourself accountable?

These are just some of the questions we need to be asking ourselves so that we can help create communities where sexual or physical assault, no matter who is doing it, is deemed unacceptable. These are the kinds of questions we as gay men need to be asking ourselves so that we can continue (or for some begin) the work of addressing gender/sex inequity in our own communities, as well as in our own hearts and minds. This is a part of our healing work. This is a part of our transformation. This is a part of our accountability.


5 days ago with 8,711 notes
originally holisticsexualhealth

(Source: kasukasukasumisty)


6 days ago with 11,366 notes
originally kasukasukasumisty
geoggadi:

Мы начинаем наше космическое путешествие в те времена, когда трава была зеленее и музыка прекраснее, когда еще не было плохой музыки, дабы вернуть давно утерянную формулу хорошей музыки. Рассекая пространство и время, мы слышим звуки божественной музыки, в которой каждая нота находится на своем месте. Кажется нечто подобное испытывают люди когда слушают альбомы Sigur Ros, некое блаженное чувтсво. Это состояние невозможно описать, трудно уловить и легко потерять, но удивительно, на всем протяжении нашего путешествия оно все усиливается и усиливается. В окне иллюминатора пролетают все самые значимые музыкальные и исторические вехи в истории. Важна уже не конечная точка прибытия, а само путешествие, потому что стремление - вот самое главное в нашей жизни, достигнув определенной точки нам обязательно захочется продолжить путешествие дальше. Честно говоря я уже не знаю где мы находимся, достигли мы того самого места? И где это место? Скорее всего мы улетели намного дальше, за пределы пространства времени. Неужели мы так и не нашли формулы? неужели все напрасно? Наше путешествие - вот та самая формула, точнее одна из ее композиций, собранная из обрывков воспоминаний. Вычислить ее невозможно, но нам крупно повезло и мы стали редкими счастливчиками которым открылась одна из идеальных музыкальных композиций. Сможем ли мы когда-нибудь повторить это путешествие… возможно не скоро, но когда-нибудь обязательно, а пока нужно вернуться на землю и передать человечеству данные собранные нашими датчиками. Мы не настолько умны чтобы из полученных данных вычислить формулу, но зато у нас появилась одна из композиций сгенерированных этой идеальной формулой. Так правильно, ведь если бы человечество обладало “ключем” ни к чему хорошему это не привело бы.

geoggadi:

Мы начинаем наше космическое путешествие в те времена, когда трава была зеленее и музыка прекраснее, когда еще не было плохой музыки, дабы вернуть давно утерянную формулу хорошей музыки. Рассекая пространство и время, мы слышим звуки божественной музыки, в которой каждая нота находится на своем месте. Кажется нечто подобное испытывают люди когда слушают альбомы Sigur Ros, некое блаженное чувтсво. Это состояние невозможно описать, трудно уловить и легко потерять, но удивительно, на всем протяжении нашего путешествия оно все усиливается и усиливается. В окне иллюминатора пролетают все самые значимые музыкальные и исторические вехи в истории. Важна уже не конечная точка прибытия, а само путешествие, потому что стремление - вот самое главное в нашей жизни, достигнув определенной точки нам обязательно захочется продолжить путешествие дальше. Честно говоря я уже не знаю где мы находимся, достигли мы того самого места? И где это место? Скорее всего мы улетели намного дальше, за пределы пространства времени. Неужели мы так и не нашли формулы? неужели все напрасно? Наше путешествие - вот та самая формула, точнее одна из ее композиций, собранная из обрывков воспоминаний. Вычислить ее невозможно, но нам крупно повезло и мы стали редкими счастливчиками которым открылась одна из идеальных музыкальных композиций. Сможем ли мы когда-нибудь повторить это путешествие… возможно не скоро, но когда-нибудь обязательно, а пока нужно вернуться на землю и передать человечеству данные собранные нашими датчиками. Мы не настолько умны чтобы из полученных данных вычислить формулу, но зато у нас появилась одна из композиций сгенерированных этой идеальной формулой. Так правильно, ведь если бы человечество обладало “ключем” ни к чему хорошему это не привело бы.


6 days ago with 66,723 notes
originally geoggadi
jelee-:

i wanted to draw the old gaang but i didn’t know which outfits from which books to draw them in then i was like oh hang on

jelee-:

i wanted to draw the old gaang but i didn’t know which outfits from which books to draw them in then i was like oh hang on


6 days ago with 55,050 notes
originally jelee-
supersoldiers:

oh my goddd it’s like every avenger fanfic ive ever read 

supersoldiers:

oh my goddd it’s like every avenger fanfic ive ever read 


6 days ago with 14,447 notes
originally supersoldiers
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